When to Water Your Lawn

As the summer heat continues, it’s more important than ever to use water efficiently and effectively for proper lawn care. However, it can be difficult to know when the best time is to water your lawn, so here are some guidelines to follow. Always attempt to water early in the morning. Around 5 am is thought by many to be the best time of day to water grass. This is due to low evaporation, low winds, high humidity and morning dew that will add to your efforts. Early morning watering can help prevent diseases that can be caused by watering at night because your lawn is allowed to dry throughout the day.   If you have just planted new grass, water once a day This will allow the seeds to germinate and allow a good root system to form beneath the soil. This process can last from 2-8 weeks, depending on what type of grass you’re planting and the season.   Try watering a day before mowing This will allow you to better avoid browning that forms on the crown (tip) of grass after mowing. It also allows your lawn to more easily recover from cutting and helps it to have a better overall appearance. For more tips on lawn care or for a consultation to see how we can best serve your needs, contact our offices in Joplin, MO and Grove, OK....

How to Aerate Your Lawn

Once you’ve concluded that you should your lawn should be aerated, here are the steps to go through in order to accomplish it. Prep the Lawn to be Aerated The lawn should be watered thoroughly one or two days before aeration takes place. This will help the aerator to penetrate through the soil and pull out soil cores more effectively. Sprinkler heads and other hidden objects should be flagged so that the aerator can be steered to avoid them. Aerate the Lawn Mechanical core aerators are best to use to aerate lawns. Their tines are hollow inside and are more effective at pulling soil cores from the earth. Spike aerators don’t work quite as well for all lawns and could further compact the soil. A lawn care specialist can advise you on which type of aerator you need and how often your particular lawn should be aerated. During the process, run the aerator over the lawn in a pattern that only covers each area once. Run the core aerator over the lawn in a pattern that covers the area only once. Administer Compost The cores pulled from the soil by the aerator can be left on the lawn and allowed to decompose. You can opt to rake them up, but it isn’t necessary as they will naturally break down into around two to four weeks. Compost (sand or peat moss may be used instead) should be sprinkled over the lawn to fill in the holes. This is also a great time to consider adding a fertilizer. Your lawn care specialist can advise you on if this is necessary and...

When to Aerate Your Lawn

Most of the time, lawn maintenance will rely on the completion of a few regular tasks. Everyone knows the need to mow, fertilize, weed and aerate. While it’s easy to tell when to mow, fertilize or weed your yard, knowing when to aerate can be a bit more difficult to determine. Aerating your lawn is important because lawns that regularly handle foot or vehicle traffic can become compacted over time. This is one of the reasons we recommend varying your mowing patterns. As lawns become compacted, water has difficulty penetrating the surface and roots aren’t able to extend like they should. Over time, your lawn will begin to lose that lush, green look you’ve worked so hard to achieve. If you notice this happening with your lawn, it may be time to aerate. Other signs to look for can include puddling water after rain, slow drainage, lack of growth and hardness of soil. A simple examination can be conducted to tell if you should aerate your lawn. Try to insert a pencil or screwdriver into the soil. If the soil is compacted, this will prove hard to accomplish. In order to verify this finding, try digging a small, square foot-section of grass about six inches deep to see if the roots are suffering. If the blade sinks easily into the ground, the soil may not be compacted. However, if it is difficult to do and causes you to struggle, you probably need to aerate. This can be further verified once the small square has been dug up. Look at the thatch. Thatch tends to lie between the grass blades...

Planting Grass Seed

Spring is the ideal time to start a new lawn or revitalize one. The rainfall and colder temperatures create a conducive growing environment that allow you to perform lawn care. The best grasses for the warm season are centipede grass and bermuda grass. Read on for instructions on planting grass seed that will make your landscaping look great. Prepare Bare Soil 1. Till the top 2 to 3 inches of the soil with a tiller or a garden rake. 2. Pick up any rocks, branches or other debris that the tiller turned up. 3. Rake the entire seedbed to help level out high and low spots and remove any clumps of dirt larger than 1 inch in diameter. 4. Apply fertilizer to the area with a drop or broadcast spreader. Follow package directions for the amount of fertilizer to spread; a typical application for new lawns uses 2 1/2 pounds of fertilizer per 1,000 square feet of lawn. Prepare Seedbed in Established Lawn 1. Set the lawnmower to cut the grass as low as possible, removing most of the vegetation from the lawn and making it easier for the grass seeds to reach the soil. 2. Rake the grass and the top one-quarter inch of the soil underneath it. Dispose of rocks and other debris in the lawn. 3. Fertilize the lawn following manufacturer’s guidelines. A typical recommendation for an existing lawn is 5 pounds of fertilizer per 1,000 square feet of lawn. Plant Grass Seed 1. Put half the grass seeds in a drop or broadcast spreader. Sow the seeds onto the prepared ground, walking back and forth...

Advantages of Hydroseeding a Lawn

Hydroseeding is the liquid application of a combined mixture of grass seed, fertilizer, pesticide, and a moisture-retaining binder sprayed under pressure over an area requiring lawn or grass cover. Most grass and ground that can be traditionally seeded can be hydroseeded. Highly Effective Hydroseeding is generally more effective than traditional methods of seeding for a number of reasons. When you’re seeding traditionally, dry seed is spread and then straw is spread above it in order to stop the seed from being blown away or eaten by birds. This type of mulching doesn’t do well to prevent premature evaporation, and soil moisture is essential for grass to grow. When hydroseeding, this is already achieved because the moisture is laid down with the seeding and the coating protects against evaporation. The problem with straw is that it carries weed seed and when it breakdowns it can steal nitrogen from the soil. Hydroseeding is way more effective at preventing soil erosion. With hydroseeding, you can custom seed your lawn with various types of grass that work best for your locale. It also allows you to plant different seeds in different areas, which is harder to achieve with traditional seeding methods. The fertilizer included with your hydroseeding will do a great job growing your grass and several different fertilizers can be combined. Better than Sodding Hydroseeding is much more cost-effective than sodding your lawn. While sodding provides a visually appealing lawn, it can be very expensive. Hydroseeding lets you create a beautiful lawn that is typically four times less expensive than sodding. Soil often doesn’t take to sodding and rejects the roots of...

Preparing Your Lawn for Spring

You can breathe a sigh of relief, preparing your lawn for the spring is generally less time consuming than preparing for winter. However, it is in your lawn’s best interest to take a little time and ensure that it’s ready for the spring season. Follow this guide for small, do-it-yourself tasks that will ensure your lawn is ready for the coming season. Remove Any Debris Grab your rake and start removing debris that has built up from the fall and winter. This includes sticks and leaves that can cause problems for mowing and other lawn care. Pay special attention to areas that appear matted, as they could be holding snow mold. Raking helps with airflow and allows new grass to grow easily. Ground Level Make sure the dirt underneath your lawn is level in all areas and hasn’t been harmed by any vehicle tracks or other damage throughout the winter. High and low spots will make it difficult to mow and lead to irrigation problems. Low spots can harbor water that will damage your lawn. To make the ground level again, use a shovel to even everything out. Take Care of Weeds Use an effective pre-emergent herbicide to stop weeds before they start growing. Once they sprout up, it can be difficult to control. If your yard is prone to crab grass, pick up a preventer made specifically for this and apply it between your first several mows. Familiarize yourself with the different types of weeds that grow in your climate, such as Chickweed, Morning Glory, and Pigweed. Being able to identify these weeds will make it that much...